Jeever Madness

dhrupad:

Raja Hindustani (1996) | “Pardesi Pardesi”

One of my favorite Hindi songs. I’m sure I’ve already shared that fact on this blog.

The Museum of Modern Art is currently showing a retrospective called Raj Kapoor and the Golden Age of Indian Cinema.

From the film exhibition’s description: Largely unknown in North America—except, of course, to millions of fans  of South Asian descent—actor, director, and mogul Raj Kapoor (1924–1988)  is revered not only in India but throughout the former Soviet world,  the Middle East, and beyond for the films he made during the Golden Age  of Indian cinema. This exhibition of eight legendary Kapoor films,  presented in newly struck 35mm prints, offers an introduction to one of  the most ravishing and influential periods of world cinema. Kapoor  founded RK Films in 1948, and it became the most important Hindi studio  of the post-Independence era—and the one most commonly associated with  that nebulous and often misunderstood expression, “Bollywood.”

I can’t wait to go to some of these screenings!

The Museum of Modern Art is currently showing a retrospective called Raj Kapoor and the Golden Age of Indian Cinema.

From the film exhibition’s description: Largely unknown in North America—except, of course, to millions of fans of South Asian descent—actor, director, and mogul Raj Kapoor (1924–1988) is revered not only in India but throughout the former Soviet world, the Middle East, and beyond for the films he made during the Golden Age of Indian cinema. This exhibition of eight legendary Kapoor films, presented in newly struck 35mm prints, offers an introduction to one of the most ravishing and influential periods of world cinema. Kapoor founded RK Films in 1948, and it became the most important Hindi studio of the post-Independence era—and the one most commonly associated with that nebulous and often misunderstood expression, “Bollywood.”

I can’t wait to go to some of these screenings!

"Madhubala" from Mere Brother Ki Dulhan

I saw this movie last night and was pleasantly surprised. It’s nothing exceptional or innovative, but is simply well-executed, reliable Bollywood.


 

Leke Pehla Pehla Pyar" from C.I.D. (1956)

A classic song from Guru Dutt's crime film. Much later, modern versions of the song and video were released because someone out there thought the originals were good, but that they really didn’t have enough misplaced reggae and awkward grinding.

Currently watching Nagin.
I’ve often said that horror movies need more dance contests and boy does this movie deliver.
But in all seriousness, this movie is teaching me to never mess with Reena Roy.

Currently watching Nagin.

I’ve often said that horror movies need more dance contests and boy does this movie deliver.

But in all seriousness, this movie is teaching me to never mess with Reena Roy.

"Oru Murai Vanthu" from the Malayalam film Manichitrathazhu

Another example of Indian horror film, Manichitrathazhu was remade four times in different regional languages, including once as Bhool Bhulaiya in Hindi. Though the plots vary slightly in each version, each of the films includes some variation of this scene.

"Main Teri Dushman" from Nagina.

Sridevi's iconic dance in this scene is one of the most famous aspects of this film. I'm really interested in how so many Indian horror films (Hindi and other regional cinemas) revolve around possessed women who threaten male members of their family. The horror genre always features interesting gender politics, and I'm curious to explore how many of these conventions manifest in Indian contexts.

Waheeda Rehman's debut in musical scene “Eruvaaka Sagaroranno Chinnanna”  from the Telugu film Rojulu Marayi (1955).

Rehman, one of India’s most celebrated actresses, is the recipient of a 2011 Padma Bhushan, the third highest civilian honor from the Republic of India for achievement in art and cinema.

bollywoodsuperstar:

The first time I saw Mani Ratnam’s Dil Se (From the Heart, 1998) was a very formative moment for me in terms of my critical interest in cinema, Indian cinema in particular. I think it may be time to revisit it.

“Dil Se Re,” one of the many iconic songs in the film, written and sung by A.R. Rahman.

This is a film I love to talk and write about (and its soundtrack has to be one of my favorites of all time) . I need to post my thoughts on “Jiya Jale” at some point.

bombayelectric:

Satyajit Ray is Electric #thegoddesswillrockyou

Devi (1960), directed by Satyajit Ray

bombayelectric:

Satyajit Ray is Electric #thegoddesswillrockyou

Devi (1960), directed by Satyajit Ray