Jeever Madness

mishthi:

NYC’s DJ Ushka’s Foreign Brown Mixtape is the best of all the eclectic musical browness in this world.

You can download the mix here: http://bit.ly/Yor9sr The mix journeys through latin, hip hop, electric powwow, samba, bhangra, african (kuduro, azonto, naija), soca, champeta, house, electronica and carioca bass.

Tracklist:

Fire Eyes ft. Lido Pimienta & Javier Alerta - Acido Azteca
Mami Moh (Chief Boima Dub)
Bayalibuza - Thornato remix
Africana - Los Rakas
Moner Alo - Brooklyn Shanti ft. Anoura
Jatt Pagal Karte ft. Jeeti - Lehmber Hussainpuri
Siempre Mas Pesa’o feat. Boogat & Madhi - Poirier
É da Nossa Cor feat. Mestre Camaleão (Sabo Remix) - Maga Bo
Let Me Love You (DJ Gregory Remix) - Bunny Mack
Oliver- D’Banj
Bum Bum -Timaya
Puto Prata Feat Bodytalk - Daniel Santos bootleg
Move to da Gyal Dem - Donae O Ft. Sarkodie
Sokode - Keche
Work - Lil Rick
Funketa (Douster remix) - Isa GT
Percolater - Cajmere
Ca Ca Ye (2melo & Thornato remix)
The Road- Tribe Called Red
Pisicodelia (Nego Mozambique Remix) - Zuzuka Poderosa & Kush Arora
Shock (Captain Planet remix) - Ana Tijoux
Galope feat. Robertinho Barreto- Maga Bo
Cape Verdeans in Paris - Chief Boima
Bad Girls (Milangeles remix) - M.I.A.
Fisketorvet Riddim (Milangeles remix) - Copia Doble Sistema
Oye Mi Negra (Copia Doble Sistema remix) - Sonido Guay

M.I.A. for Jalouse Magazine, photographed by Romain Gavras.

For those in the NYC area, this is sure to be a fantastic event!

dhrupad:

Raja Hindustani (1996) | “Pardesi Pardesi”

One of my favorite Hindi songs. I’m sure I’ve already shared that fact on this blog.

Happy Onam to all my fellow Malayalees!

Happy Onam to all my fellow Malayalees!

As a huge fan of Mindy Kaling, I was excited to hear that Fox would be previewing the pilot of The Mindy Project online before the show premieres in September. While the episode has many of the expected downfalls of a pilot, there’s definitely quite a bit of potential. As a South Asian American, there is something particularly promising about the character of Mindy Lahiri. While time will still tell if and how the show confronts its star’s race (beyond a throwaway joke in the pilot), it’s quite refreshing that nothing about this character seems predestined by her Indian American background. While it is still perfectly possible to have conversations about race in the show and what it means for the way South Asians are being represented in American popular culture, it’s also possible to discuss the show without mentioning Kaling’s background at all. Mindy Lahiri is not a stereotype, but just as importantly, she’s not just a device disguised as a character whose sole purpose is to launch discussions of race. This subtly dangerous practice is often ignored because its usually such a relief to see characters of color on TV, but in terms of expanding the types of opportunities nonwhite actors have in the entertainment industry, it can be almost as restrictive as character credits like “convenience store worker” or “cab driver.”
Obviously, there’s nothing wrong with having characters of color who confront the realities of race. In fact, when this does happen on mainstream television in ways that feel organic, complex, and honest, it’s a reason for celebration. However, there is something extremely problematic about the notion that characters of color must confront race, and The Mindy Project makes major progress in challenging that expectation. Though I doubt it will keep people from using reductive labels, this is no more “a show about an Indian girl” than The New Girl is “a show about a white girl;” while technically accurate, both of these characterizations are insufficient, although for many viewers, such a description would unfortunately be more identifiably lacking in the case of the latter than the former. I will continue watching The Mindy Project to see how it develops, but for the time being, I hope nobody will ask me if I checked out “that show about the Indian girl.”

As a huge fan of Mindy Kaling, I was excited to hear that Fox would be previewing the pilot of The Mindy Project online before the show premieres in September. While the episode has many of the expected downfalls of a pilot, there’s definitely quite a bit of potential. As a South Asian American, there is something particularly promising about the character of Mindy Lahiri. While time will still tell if and how the show confronts its star’s race (beyond a throwaway joke in the pilot), it’s quite refreshing that nothing about this character seems predestined by her Indian American background. While it is still perfectly possible to have conversations about race in the show and what it means for the way South Asians are being represented in American popular culture, it’s also possible to discuss the show without mentioning Kaling’s background at all. Mindy Lahiri is not a stereotype, but just as importantly, she’s not just a device disguised as a character whose sole purpose is to launch discussions of race. This subtly dangerous practice is often ignored because its usually such a relief to see characters of color on TV, but in terms of expanding the types of opportunities nonwhite actors have in the entertainment industry, it can be almost as restrictive as character credits like “convenience store worker” or “cab driver.”

Obviously, there’s nothing wrong with having characters of color who confront the realities of race. In fact, when this does happen on mainstream television in ways that feel organic, complex, and honest, it’s a reason for celebration. However, there is something extremely problematic about the notion that characters of color must confront race, and The Mindy Project makes major progress in challenging that expectation. Though I doubt it will keep people from using reductive labels, this is no more “a show about an Indian girl” than The New Girl is “a show about a white girl;” while technically accurate, both of these characterizations are insufficient, although for many viewers, such a description would unfortunately be more identifiably lacking in the case of the latter than the former. I will continue watching The Mindy Project to see how it develops, but for the time being, I hope nobody will ask me if I checked out “that show about the Indian girl.”

…Up in New York City’s Washington Heights, I saw white men with small U.S. flags make the rounds of the immigrant-owned small grocery stores. They banged these flags, which retailed at about $1 each, on counters and said things like “Aren’t you going to be a patriot and buy this flag?” The flags cost the immigrant workers $5 each, but they were far too scared to refuse. The test of loyalty provided a business opportunity for the young white men, and it forced the small shops to fly as many flags as possible. Patriotism is not, in this instance, the refuge of scoundrels. It is an act of desperation.

Vijay Prashad, Uncle Swami: South Asians in America Today

Prashad’s follow-up to The Karma of Brown Folk arrives at a hugely significant moment, as its subject matter is startlingly relevant to the recent shootings at the Oak Creek Gurdwara. The book also covers the post-9/11 rise of Islamophobia among American Hindus, as well as the political strategies adopted by the rising Hindutva lobby in the United States. For those interested in the South Asia diaspora, Prashad’s book is a must-read!

What a huge loss. I’m a huge fan of Dasgupta’s work and his successful balance of commercial and artistic appeal.

"We are not Muslims" hasn’t been so effective for our community, has it? Even if we do so in a positive way that does not condone attacks on Muslims, simply educating the public about the fact that we are a distinct community and that we in fact "are not Muslim" will not get to the root of the problem. As long as we live in a country (and world) where an entire community (in this case, Muslims) is targeted, spied on and vilified, we will not be safe, we will not be free.

This is an important article from earlier this year that clearly resonates with today’s tragic events. This is a significant point both for the media and South Asians responding to the horrifying violence in Oak Creek.

Promotional stills for Deepa Mehta's upcoming adaptation of Salman Rushdie's Midnight’s Children.

Adapting Midnight’s Children seemed like an impossible task, and I was doubtful that this film would actually happen until production actually started. There seemed to be far too much in the novel for an easy film adaptation, and Rushdie’s style seemed especially difficult to translate to the screen. That being said, I’m not one to get up in arms about a film’s fidelity to its source if the film can stand on its own merits. Even if much of the novel had to be cut to allow for a running time under three hours, I’ll be happy if the adaptation can both capture the spirit of the novel and find originality and innovation as a work of cinema.

bombayelectric:

Lakshmi Menon x Elephant Love

bombayelectric:

Lakshmi Menon x Elephant Love

bombayelectric:

Salvador Dali x Shiva Nataraja

bombayelectric:

Salvador Dali x Shiva Nataraja

Today, I went to get my hair cut and Das Racist was at my barbershop. Somehow, I ended up taking a picture with Dap’s back hair while looking super serious. Dreams do come true, children.

Today, I went to get my hair cut and Das Racist was at my barbershop. Somehow, I ended up taking a picture with Dap’s back hair while looking super serious. Dreams do come true, children.

It feels like a good afternoon for some quality cinema. Smita Patil is absolutely brilliant in Ketan Mehta's Mirch Masala.

It feels like a good afternoon for some quality cinema. Smita Patil is absolutely brilliant in Ketan Mehta's Mirch Masala.

ReRecord (2009) by Ajit Chauhan 
Via the Saatchi Gallery:

American born Ajit Chauhan, based in San Francisco, is an artist attempting to subvert our sense of perception by reorganizing existing visual languages. For one of his most recent body of works entitled ‘ReRecord’ Chauhan uses old vinyl albums. The work is composed of 160 erased record covers pinned together onto a wall, forming unresolved and slightly faded portraits that recall and highlight the ephemeral nature of things. The record covers can be seen as a marketing tool & a form of expression. They are an expression of marketing, which is playfully undermined. Chauhan’s unresolved portraits are rendered abstract and a reoccurring absence of detail unsettles any sense of something more substantial. Chauhan’s playfulness, upon what already exists, amounts to a work of delicate resolve and mild amusement.

ReRecord (2009) by Ajit Chauhan

Via the Saatchi Gallery:

American born Ajit Chauhan, based in San Francisco, is an artist attempting to subvert our sense of perception by reorganizing existing visual languages. For one of his most recent body of works entitled ‘ReRecord’ Chauhan uses old vinyl albums. The work is composed of 160 erased record covers pinned together onto a wall, forming unresolved and slightly faded portraits that recall and highlight the ephemeral nature of things. The record covers can be seen as a marketing tool & a form of expression. They are an expression of marketing, which is playfully undermined. Chauhan’s unresolved portraits are rendered abstract and a reoccurring absence of detail unsettles any sense of something more substantial. Chauhan’s playfulness, upon what already exists, amounts to a work of delicate resolve and mild amusement.